3306 SW 6th Ave

OFFICE HOURS

10 am - 3 pm Monday - Friday

Call for appointment

Mailing address

P.O. Box 4170

Amarillo, TX 79116

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CMA's Musical Instruments

Fazioli F278

Fazioli Pianoforti is a high-end maker of hand-built pianos, based in Sacile, Italy. Fazioli produces only about 100 pianos a year from its single factory. Coming in at an impressive 9ft 2 in, unique for its design, build, tone, and impeccable attention to detail. A boutique instrument handcrafted with quality components, including a soundboard of spruce wood from the same forest as Stradivari violins. The Fazioli 278 will join Texas Tech and UNT as only the 3rd model in the state of Texas and the 37th model in the U.S. purchased by institutions. During the last 20 years, Chamber Music Amarillo has enjoyed exponential growth, both artistically and administratively. CMA has steadily gained artistic respect among our community peers and community at large. The Fazioli 278 physically and visually represents who we are as an organization. Our mantra: a high quality, unique, and special experience centered around the incredible representation of humanity through intimate musical experiences. This was only possible through the help and generous support of our fantastic community. In celebration of this new instrument in our community, Chamber Music Amarillo is pleased to announce the Fazioli Concert Series, with our inaugural concert on March 22, 2020 featuring Ashley Tauhert, Winner of the Texas Association for Symphony Orchestras' Juanita Miller Competition. For more information, please visit our event.

Opus 1024 Kevin Fryer Harpsichord

Chamber Music Amarillo is grateful for the opportunity to own such a stunning string instrument. This is only possible because of an extraordinary anonymous donation. We are grateful to those who bestowed upon us such a gift. Luthier Kevin Fryer - Since 1989 my studio has been located in the Bayview district in San Francisco. It has long been my belief that by sharing information, ideas, and resources we advance our understanding and deepen our appreciation of  the field of Early Music. In keeping with this philosophy I have over the years, enjoyed sharing my studio space with a number of distinguished colleagues. For ten years I had the privilege of working in the same studio with Andrew Lagerquist. Andrew’s wealth of experience has been accumulated over many years and dates back to his early years working with Frank Hubbard. I also have enjoyed the process of teaching. Ron Nakashima studied with me for a period of four years. We began by working on major rebuilding projects, and then Ron designed and built a fine instrument of his own in the Ruckers tradition. Now Ron Nakashima keeps his own studio and is building and repairing instruments a few doors down the hall. I’ve taken on a new apprentice, Steve Renaker, who started working with me in the beginning of 07. He began working on repair projects, and learning the skills required for concert tuning. I first became interested in harpsichords in the late 70s. In 1980, I built my first instrument, a Flemish Single from Zuckermann Harpsichords Inc. I then studied with San Francisco teacher and performer Kathy Roberts Perl, who continues to be my teacher and valued adviser to this day. I went into business in 1984 and shortly thereafter, began a professional relationship with David Way of Zuckerman Harpsichords, becoming his agent for the San Francisco Bay Area. This relationship lasted until 1992 when I left ZHI to pursue my own building from historical designs. I have also been active with several West Coast arts organization. From 1985 to 1995, I worked with Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra serving variously as stage manager, harpsichord technician, and tour manager. I also worked with Carmel Bach Festival from 1988 to 1997. And I served on the Board of Directors of the San Francisco Early Music Society including Board President from 1989 to 1992.